Thursday’s Hilo #Doors with a View

Hilo Bay View

While on the Big island of Hawaii this week, I looked for a variety of interesting subjects to photograph. I hadn’t posted a Thursday Doors post in quite a while and hoped to find some special doors here in Hilo.

Although there are some beautiful homes, their doors are nothing special…here are the only two I saw on one of my walks.

Hilo Front Doors
Best looking doors in the neighborhood.

A modest Colonial hosts some happy dogs.

Hilo Home door with dog
Modest Colonial Style

You know why their doors are nothing special? Because I believe folks focus on what is viewed from outside their doors!

Like this view of Hilo Bay from where these two houses are located.

Hilo Bay View
Looking across to the other side of Hilo Bay.

I probably would have “no worries” about how my door might look to a passerby when I could watch the surfers all day.

Hilo Bay Surfers
Surfs up on Hilo Bay

And who would be looking at the doors anyway?

Any interesting doors in your part of the world? Check out Norm’s weekly feature Thursday Doors!

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My New Favorite Place

Chair at Hilo Bay

Chair at Hilo Bay

Surprise! No, your eyes do not deceive you, and yes, I am publishing a post a few weeks early!

It is spring break for me and while I am still busy creating lectures and grading papers for this new class, I actually have some down time.

Plus, I couldn’t resist posting for this week’s photo challenge Favorite Place.

For those who know me, I have filled my blog pages with images of Yosemite (my all time favorite place)…

Green helmeted cyclist (my hubby) admires stunning view of Yosemite Falls Spring 2016
Green helmeted cyclist (my hubby) admires stunning view of Yosemite Falls Spring 2016

…or the Sacramento Delta.

Sunset Sailing Session

Although I have several favorite places, my heart now lies in Hilo, Hawaii.

Since that magical trip in January, the warm, tropical climate, laid back atmosphere, and shockingly green vistas have been calling me back. The above featured image shows the serene park setting overlooking Hilo Bay, while the image below captures the lush green plant life near the black sands.

Black sand and lush palms

 

For more Big Island photography, visit Graham’s Island. Graham posts beautiful photos of life on the Big Island!

Sunday Stills Revisited…Preliminary Plans for My New Feature

Apparently, I must miss blogging because I tend to dream about it. Last night I suddenly got inspired by the now defunct feature, Sunday Stills, a photo challenge hosted by Ed for several years. Notice there are no links because he hung up his blog and deleted his site.

My addled and sleepy brain managed to churn out an idea that I am playing around with, to bring back the Sunday Stills photo challenge with the help of a couple of photobloggers! If you are intrigued by this notion, shoot me an e-mail through my contact page. More about this in early April, with the plan to launch the feature in May.

For now, think about your favorite place and I look forward to reconnecting with all of you soon! I miss you all and I appreciate you stopping in to say hello!

Mahalo!Tiki signature

False Alarms and the Silence of Leisure Spaces

The silence of nature is very real...

The silence of nature is very real...

In early January, my husband and I spent a glorious week in Hilo, on the Big Island of Hawaii.

The Silence of Leisure Spaces

We spent several days exploring the nearby beaches and waterfalls just enjoying the sounds of nature.

Hilo Surfers

We sat and ate our lunch in silence and simply enjoyed the show the surfers and boogie-boarders put on.

To sit in silence at the shore, watch the waves and hear the surf, is to appreciate the very breath and heartbeat of the earth. – Doe Zantamata

A look at a spot near Rainbow Falls. We did a lot of walking to various locations, taking in the “noises” of leisure.

leisure is a form of silence contemplated in the form of a waterfall

“Leisure is a form of silence, not noiselessness. It is the silence of contemplation such as occurs when we let our minds rest on a rosebud, a child at play, a divine mystery, or a waterfall.” – Fulton J Sheen

Our first night we were greeted by the sublime and not-so-silent sounds of Coqui tree frogs whistling through the night. Here is a short YouTube clip of their sound. The Coqui frogs are an invasive species on the Big Island and many folks are irritated at their nocturnal noise. Strangely, we could sleep to their sweet serenade.


Though we had a TV in our room, we chose to play Hawaiian music on our Spotify app. Imagine no news, politics or ridiculousness for 6 days!

A Not-So-Silent Alarm

Many readers have asked me if we were in Hawaii when the false missile alarm sounded. Yes, we were. We were heading to breakfast in Hilo before we drove to Kona to catch our flight back to San Diego.

The alarm burst through on millions of mobile phones ending in deadly silence as shocked people read “BALLISTIC MISSILE THREAT INBOUND TO HAWAII. SEEK IMMEDIATE SHELTER. THIS IS NOT A DRILL.”

Umm, we’re on an island, how do we take shelter?

I had left my purse and phone in the car to run back to our room at the B&B and didn’t hear the first alarm. My hubby looked at me oddly and said “Something’s happening. I’m afraid to tell you…it’s on your phone.” I looked at the alert, feeling strangely detached and simply said, “it’s bullsh*t!” I immediately googled “missile threat Hawaii” and nothing came up, convincing me that this was fake.

All I could think about was, we’re flying off this island in 6 hours, and what’s for breakfast? We went to one restaurant which abruptly closed due to the missile. That was aggravating. You might as well go into eternity on a full stomach.

Not to be deterred, we drove further down the street to Ken’s House of Pancakes for their specialty macadamia nut pancakes. My hubby asked the waitress for the “Missile Special” and she howled with laughter! Looking around the place, most of the diners didn’t seem upset or worried that their lives were about to end.

As we waited for our orders, the silence was broken again as the klaxon alarm blared once more on everyone’s phones. This time telling us it was a false alarm. Almost in unison, diners looked at their phones, put them down and continued eating.

Talk about “no worries” mentality!

My bucket list item of visiting the Big Island for the first time with my husband was not going to end with us kicking the actual bucket that day. We enjoyed our breakfast and drove over to the Kona side and went on with the rest of our day.

Do you enjoy the silence that nature or leisure can offer to you?

Silence is the theme for the WordPress Weekly photo challenge.

Mahalo for reading!

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Weathered: Lava’s Journey to the Bottoms of My Feet

Hawaii's Black Sand Beach

Hawaii's Black Sand Beach

Although our week on the Big Island of Hawaii is nearing its end, I managed to incorporate our visit to Volcanoes National Park into the Weekly Photo challenge: Weathered.

Where did the sand of the famous Black Sand Beach at Punahu’u come from?

Weathering is the change of appearance or texture of dried lava rock over countless eons of exposure to the elements.

Most folks know that the island chain of Hawaii was created over tens of thousands of years of volcanic activity,  which continues to this day. In fact, the volcano, known as the Kilauea Caldera, is active and attracts millions of curious tourists each year to the Big Island.

A look at the Kilauea Caldera over three miles wide. Another crater within the caldera spews out sulfuric steam through it’s vents as water enters cracks in the rocks and comes in contact with the magma.

Hawaii's Kileaua Caldera

When a weakness in the Earth’s crust causes an eruption, the lava flows over the land and into the ocean. As it cools it leaves curious shapes that gradually erode over time.

Some of the lava rock is used for fencing and landscaping, being an abundant, natural, and inexpensive resource to use. Like any natural element, it continues to weather over time, as shown on the lava rock fence below.

Lava Rock used as Fence

This photo was taken at the historic Volcano House across from the Caldera, the steam vent seen in the distance.

Black Sand Beach at Punahu'uThere are a few black sand beaches on the Big Island and one on Maui, all near volcanic sites. The weathering process of the air and ocean water eventually breaks the lava rock down into fine sand that inevitably finds it’s way under the soles of your bare feet, as featured in the image above.  The lava flows in this area are considered the southeast rift zone of Kilauea which flows toward Punalu’u beach This sand was silky soft and amazing to see and feel.

For native Hawaiians, the Kilauea Caldera is the home of Pelehonuamea–Pele of the earth–the goddess of fire and volcanoes, and the creator and rejuvenator of new lands. Plaque at Hawaii Volcanoes National Park.

Visiting the Big Island (anywhere in the Hawaiian Islands) has long been on my bucket list. Feeling the black sands beneath my toes was another. A few more items have been checked off, too, so stay tuned!

Aloha!

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