The Dreaded Fitness Cliff: Five Fixes To Save Your Workouts

The Fitness Cliff: 5 Fixes to save your workouts

 

The Fitness Cliff: 5 Fixes to save your workouts

February is already here and you have been working diligently the whole month of January to achieve your fitness goals. Perhaps you have been swimming, strength training, taking yoga classes, or just walking or jogging in the fresh air. How are you feeling? Do you feel like you are accomplishing your goals?

Or have you fallen off the dreaded Fitness Cliff?

CBS News recently reported, according to a survey by Gold’s Gym, February 9, 2016 was this year’s cliff. It was also Fat Tuesday. A bad day to feel fat! If you have gotten bored with your routine, or have already thrown in the towel, read this post now!

If you have any doubts about your exercise and fitness regimen, here are some tips to freshen up your routine and save your workouts.

1. Add more time to your workout. If you are walking for 20 minutes, add five more minutes to your time over the next two weeks. When you feel ready, add another five minutes, and so on.

2. Try cross training. This can be as simple as trying a new exercise or activity. If you belong to a gym, try a spin class, zumba or boot camp. Adding a completely new and different type of workout exercises new muscles and can invigorate your fitness routine. If gyms are not your thing, check into your local recreation center for fitness classes.

Cycling buddy, cold day bike ride3. Buddy up. To help keep you motivated, bring a guest along to your gym workouts. Many gyms offer guest incentives and low new member rates this time of year. Hiring a personal trainer can boost your workout as well as introduce you to new exercises. A trainer can motivate you and push you to work harder. Simply walking or jogging with a friend can be an added incentive to continue your workouts. Boredom is a workout killer and having a friend along can help keep you both accountable and motivated. Joining classes with regular attendees and instructors can also be an incentive.

4. Check out your workout gear. If you are wearing the same old shoes you’ve had since 2010, it may be time to change them! Look for wear and tear in your footwear to make sure you aren’t causing harm to your feet, knees and legs. If you swim, take a close look at your goggles or perhaps fins if using them. Many stores have winter clearance sales. Now is the time to buy something new to add to your exercise wardrobe. Nothing like a bright color to put a spring in your step!

5. Quantify what you have accomplished so far. Write down how many days you exercise, for how long, record any inches or weight lost (or gained). Do your clothes feel looser? Keeping an exercise journal can be very simple, from jotting on a notepad to keeping track on a mobile app. By writing things down, you can visually see what you have accomplished and see what else you might need to do to adjust.

Bonus Fitness Fix: Fitness Trackers
The latest trend in fitness has been the wearable fitness tracker. These are activity and sleep monitors that track user movements and activity levels to provide information on metrics including step count, calories burned, distance traveled, and number of hours of light and deep sleep via mobile technology. More notable are Fitbit, Misfit Wearables, and Jawbone. I recently started the wearing the Fitbit One and I am very pleased with its tracking ability. See my in-depth post Keeping Track of Your Fitness Progress.

Don’t let foul weather prevent you from getting your exercise each day. Don’t let a couple of setbacks be a barrier to regular exercise. Life can get in the way and disrupt our routines. Unfortunately, it seems easier to abandon our exercise plans when faced with time constraints or lack of interest.

We all need to live balanced lives, and committing to leisure in the form of fitness and exercise in a consistent manner can lead to better health and happiness!

Breaking Barriers of Self-Doubt in Leisure

Face your fears. Windsurfing in Baja, Mexico.

Face your fears. Windsurfing in Baja, Mexico.

If you keep up with my blog, you know I share my perspectives on leisure. My Leisurely Thursday feature is my platform for introducing and discussing concepts related to leisure education as well as to illuminate why leisure is a basic need in our lives.

Today’s focus is on self-inflicted barriers that prevent us from participating in our leisure past-times.

“Do one thing every day that scares you.” Eleanor Roosevelt

Are you a person who inadvertently creates obstacles that prevent you from enjoying your leisure time? Actually, we all do to some degree. The good news is, we have the ability to overcome the fear, the barriers, and the obstacles that potentially rob us of our joy.

Using myself as an example, many of you know that I am a windsurfer. I am not a confident windsurfer. I began this very late in life (age 49) and this is an extremely difficult sport/hobby to learn. I have been athletic my entire life and learning most sports came easily to me. Not this one.

Although I have sailed at the delta these past six seasons, I am still anxious about going out. Wind conditions change daily and the water can be fickle due to high or low tides.

Never mind sailing in a daunting ocean environment.

Fear. It hits me.

Every. Single. Time.

Self-doubt about our abilities in leisure is common. What is it that we fear? Injury? Humiliation? Failure? All of the above?

Without going into details of getting my windsurf gear past the shore break, I had some difficulty the day before. I convinced myself that I was NOT EVER going to windsurf again.

Lured by another gorgeous day of sun and perfect wind the next day, I really wanted to prove to myself that I could do this. It is hard to tell in the picture, but those waves were cresting at 5 feet high.

I was terrified.

My hubby captured this moment in the photo above.

Within a few feet of shore, the water was over my head and I could not touch the bottom. Once I got the board and sail organized, I had to push it out past the cresting waves and sail from a water start position. I still had a little trouble, but I got up and sailed into the surf. Gawd, it was fun!

These are the times in our leisure moments that getting past that barrier of self-doubt begins the process of success.

I still experience fear and anxiety about sailing and probably always will. The fear of looking stupid is as strong as the fear of failing so miserably that I must perform the walk of shame or crawl unceremoniously out of the water onto the rocks.

But…it sure does feel fantastic when I experience a grand sailing session.

Windsurfing in La Ventana, Baja

My friend, Jessica Edouard, on her blog, Send Sunshine posted this recently.
Hysterical Blindness

“Inside our hearts, we have the ability to overcome the obstacles created within our mind”

Coincidentally, she not only articulated some thoughts related to my post, she used one of the photos I had sent her of sunflowers. She does brilliant work with her photos and shares an inspirational post every DAY!! Please check out her blog!

 

I challenge you to “do one thing every day that scares you.” 

Pushing past that barrier is very esteeming to us and we need these successful moments in our leisure time regardless of the complexity of the activity.

What will you do to push past your fear of participating in a new leisure activity?


 

I hope you enjoyed this small excerpt from the e-book I am writing.

Defying Gravity

Weightless water

Weight(less)

I am traveling home after a nice long vacation in Baja Sur, Mexico. For my Leisurely Thursday post, I could not resist including another set of photos for the Weekly Photo Challenge.

I took these photos on my last day in La Ventana.  The warm desert air combined with the 72 degree water of the Sea of Cortez creates incredible windy conditions from November through March, making this area south of La Paz thee winter destination for windsurf and kiteboard enthusiasts from all over the world

A variety of birds, including turkey vultures, pelicans and other sea birds glide effortlessly on the warm thermals created by the wind and warm water. Here a turkey vulture enjoys a thermal as the windsock indicates a good north wind.

Weightless Wings

A few miles away on the Bahia de la Ventana, a rocky outcropping called “the Boof” provides a visual delight at high tide as the waves crash against the rocks and holes eroded over time.

Weightless Water

Water briefly defies gravity at over 12 feet high.

Water becomes weightless

What makes you feel weightless?

I am adding this to Jennifer Nicole Wells’ color your world weekly photo challenge blue-green.

Leisurely Thursdays: Winter Cycling Tips

Winter Cycling Safety. Reflective, bright clothing.

As winter draws near in the Northern Hemisphere, avid cyclists and even recreational bicyclists still enjoy their rides, whether for fitness, fun, or transportation. For my Leisurely Thursday post, I share tips to help you with your fall and winter cycling experience. In temperate climates like California or Florida, where cycling can be enjoyed almost year round, fall and winter can still bring surprises to your ride.Cyclists ride in twilight

Time Changes and Darkness

Be mindful of the time of day you ride your bike. As winter sets in, there is a lot less daylight. Plan your ride for daylight hours when possible. Motorists have enough trouble seeing cyclists in broad daylight, let alone in dawn or dusk hours. Get a good headlight and use it when the sun is low in the sky. You need a flashing red tail-light so others can see you. If you commute and ride at night, take extra care and use as much light as possible.

Darkness may also bring on undesirable loiterers. Urban bike trails can be places where homeless build their camps. Although law enforcement tries to minimize and mitigate this practice, campers and loiterers are more prolific especially in temperate geographical areas where winters are not as harsh. If you see suspicious activity, quickly ride past and avoid stopping. Even in daylight hours, be mindful of where you stop for a break. Assaults happen to both women and men.

My hubby recently experienced a flat tire near dusk. Even with his tire kit, it still took him longer than expected and darkness was upon him before his ride was done. He went out the next day and bought the headlight!

Weather

Fall and early winter can be great times for riding long distances because of the cooler air. While it may feel great to ride extra miles in 50 degree temps, the urge to drink water will lessen due to the cold. Force yourself to drink more water, even if you do not feel thirsty. Our area experiences the dry north winds which feel cool, but are very dehydrating. Also, bring food for a long ride. In cold air, you will burn more calories.

Fall and winter weather can be capricious and unsettled. If you plan a long ride, check the local weather for changes. What may start out as a warm sunny day can end in stormy, rainy weather.

Changes in seasons and weather can also add more debris on the roads and trails. Autumn will find leaves, nuts, and other tree-fall that can be dangerous when ridden over. If you ride on urban trails, be mindful of rodents that are hoarding nuts for their hibernation and winter nap. Squirrels are known to dart out suddenly onto roads and trails and can cause accidents to unsuspecting cyclists. Other animals may be seen on the roads and trails, like deer, waterfowl and other creatures foraging for food.

In late fall and winter, ice and snow can be issues. Watch for black ice on roads and urban trails and keep your eyes on the road. It is easy to get distracted while riding and fiddling with your phone, and therefore miss seeing the acorn or ice patch that takes you down.

More road debris can flatten a tire quickly, so be sure to pack your tire change kit, even if it is just a short leisurely ride. Pack two tubes just to be safe.

Clothing and Gear

Layer your clothing so that if you feel warm, you can change, then add it when you feel cold again. If your arms and legs are bare, use sunscreen, even on a cool, cloudy day. UVA and UVB rays still penetrate cloud layers and can cause sunburn. Lotion helps with windburn as well.

Wear bright, reflective clothing to be more easily seen by motorists. This can be added as a top layer over winter garb. Protect your mobile phone in plastic or something to protect it from moisture. Even if you wear your phone next to your body, wrap it, so perspiration doesn’t destroy it.

Winter Cycling Safety. Reflective, bright clothing.Many retail stores sell great winter cycling clothing. I’ve seen lots of riders add arm and leg warmers, helmet covers and toe warmers to their normal gear to help fend off the cold. Since my hubby is bald on top, he wears a bandana under his bike helmet to keep his head warm. Wearing a headband under your helmet also keeps your ears warm. Wearing gloves is also recommended to keep your hands warm and responsive.

I like to wear sunglasses when I ride, even on cloudy days, to protect  my eyes from wind, rain, grit and bugs. The cold air always makes my eyes tear, so I also carry a small handkerchief with me. Clear lenses are also available from your retailer.

Before you head out on your winter cycling experience, check with your local bike retail store and get tips from the pros. And of course, have your bicycle checked thoroughly and tuned up if necessary. Many cyclists change their tires to a more robust tread. Add a mudguard to prevent water and mud from hitting your backside and riders directly behind you.

Depending upon where you live (ride), your bike can get very dirty from mud, debris and salt from the road. When your ride is done, clean the chains, brakes, and tires as soon as possible.

If you absolutely cannot go out on your bike, at least go to the gym and ride the stationary bike as a LAST resort!

For those in the Southern Hemisphere who are experiencing spring and soon, summer, please read this post…15 Summer Cycling Safety Tips.

For more cycling tips, check out this blog, Fit is a Feminist Issue, specifically Proper Bike Fit and Two Bike Cultures.

Cycling is a wonderful way to exercise and stay fit even in cold weather. Challenge yourself to ride and use these tips to help you! Do you cycle in the fall and winter months? Tell me about it!

Seven Summer Fitness Strategies

Family-Fitness
Seniors-enjoying-water-Aerobics
image by Kimberly Glaster; used by permission

It is no secret that being physically fit prevents illness, keeps or gets us lean, and is ideal for overall health. Everyone has their own definition of fitness. Although May is National Physical Fitness and Sports Month, fitness should be an attainable goal all year long.

The trouble with summer fitness is…it’s hot outside! Heat for many can be a huge deterrent to consistent exercise. Other barriers to working out in the summer-time? Vacations and travel, chasing kids, new injuries as a result of weekend warrior syndrome, and other pesky summer issues.

If you have any doubts about your exercise and fitness regimen, here are some summer fitness strategies and tips to freshen up your summer routine and keep you healthy and motivated.

1. What are your time obligations during the summer?  Does the nature of your job change with the seasons? Perhaps you are a seasonal worker, college student, or school-teacher. A drastic change in work routine can be a barrier to finding the right time to exercise. Squeeze in short walks throughout the day. Shorter spurts of exercise, such as 10 minutes of walking spaced throughout the day, offer benefits too. Make lunchtime count. While at work, keep a pair of walking shoes at your desk, and take a brisk walk during your lunch break.

If your summer evenings are free and it is cooler to exercise, try these tips: 

  • Start a walking group. Round up friends, neighbors or co-workers for regular group walks. Plan routes through your neighborhood or near your workplace, along local parks and trails, or in a nearby shopping mall. Simply walking or jogging with a friend can be an added incentive to continue your workouts.Boredom is a workout killer and having a friend along can help keep you both accountable.
  • Visit your community recreation center or local swimming pool. Many recreation programs are offered after work hours. Join a club or summer sport team. In a recent post, “Who Says Adults Can’t Have Recess” there are non-competitive alternatives for organized sports

If evenings don’t work, try getting up earlier. The sun is up earlier on summer mornings, so an early morning walk or run can kick-start your day. Wake up 30 minutes earlier twice a week to exercise. Once you’ve adjusted to early-morning workouts, add another day or two to the routine.

If your days are limited, add more time to your workout. If you are walking for 20 minutes, add five more minutes to your time over the next two weeks. When you feel ready, add another five minutes, and so on. In a previous post, I suggested ways to get three hours a week for fitness.

2. If your exercise has become boring, revamp your routine. Your weekly Saturday matinee with the kids could become a weekly Saturday bike ride, rock-climbing lesson or trip to the pool. Choose acFamily-Fitnesstivities you enjoy and you will be more likely to stay interested.

Try cross training. This can be as simple as trying a new exercise or activity. If you belong to a gym, try a spin class, zumba or body pump. Adding new exercises and rotating through different type of activities, such as walking, swimming and cycling, works out new muscles and can invigorate your fitness routine.

3. No energy to exercise? Without exercise, you’ll have no energy. It’s a vicious cycle. Perhaps you are a stay-at-home-parent and spend your summers chasing your kids. Longer summer evenings mean more time for evening fitness activities with your family. After dinner, get everyone moving during a brisk evening walk.

4. Are you a weekend warrior who is nursing a sports injury? Get professional help from a certified expert, who can monitor your movements and point you in the right direction. If your injury is serious, visit a sports medicine physician, who can evaluate you and recommend specific treatment, such as physical therapy.

If you belong to a gym, hiring a personal trainer can boost your workout as well as introduce you to new exercises. A trainer can motivate you and give you the proper exercises to help heal the injury and get you back on track.

5. If you are planning a long vacation or holiday where traveling will take you away from your routine, try these suggestions:

  • If your vacation takes you into the outdoors on a daily basis, embrace what the area has to offer. Plan ahead and pack the right shoes, clothing and equipment to enjoy the hiking trails, the lakes or other wonderful leisure spaces available to you.
  • Are you staying in a resort or hotel? Check to see what amenities it offers to guests.
  • If you are traveling and visiting friends or family members, ask them what they do for exercise. If you belong to a national chain health club, find a nearby gym and schedule time to go. Or visit their gym as a guest. Just about every neighborhood has a local park with recreation facilities like jogging/walking trail, tennis courts, club house or swimming pool. Again, plan ahead by asking your hosts for the name of the organization and check their online class schedule.

6. Quantify what you have accomplished so far. Keeping a record over a period of time and seeing results can be extremely motivating. Write down how many days you exercise, for how long, record any inches or weight lost (or gained). Do your clothes feel looser? Keeping an exercise journal can be very simple, from jotting on a notepad to keeping track on a mobile app. By writing things down, you can visually see what you have accomplished and see what else you might need to do to adjust.

7. Check out your gear. If you are wearing the same old shoes you’ve had since 2011, look for wear and tear to make sure you aren’t causing harm to your feet, knees and legs. If you swim, take a close look at your goggles or perhaps fins if using them. Many stores have summer clearance sales. Now is the time to buy something new to add to your exercise wardrobe. Nothing like a bright color to put a spring in your step!

Don’t let hot weather prevent you from getting your exercise each day. Don’t let a couple of setbacks be a barrier to regular exercise. Life can get in the way and disrupt our routines. Unfortunately, it seems easier to abandon our exercise plans when faced with time constraints or other barriers.

We all need to live balanced lives, and committing to leisure in the form of exercise in a consistent manner can lead to better health and happiness!

 

What’s In Your Beach Tote?

Whats-In-Your-Beach-Tote

Whats-In-Your-Beach-Tote

Nothing says Independence Day holidays (4th of July) like a day at the beach. If it is summer where you are, no doubt you have been to the beach or are planning to go. Today, I will share the best items to have in your beach tote, whether you are a parent taking the kiddos or just yourself.

The beach can be a sandy or grassy area, near a body of water whether it is a lake, a river, the bay, or the ocean. I grew up on the beaches of San Diego, spent some beach time next to lakes and rivers in Yosemite, and now along the beaches of the delta.

Let’s start with the right bag. Pictured here is one I use. I bought this through Home Shopping Network (HSN) through the lady who sells the huggable hangers, Joy Mangano. This is not an endorsement, but many of her products are inventive, useful and very practical.

This bag has it all. It is a good size with comfortable handles for hands or shoulders. It also has two side pockets large enough for water bottles or sunscreen. Inside is another deep, interior zippered pocket. This bag is unique in that it also has an insulated zippered section to store cold items (use your own freezer pack or ice).

Tote-bag
image from amazon.com

If you hate sand as much as I do, this bag even has a solution for that. The bottom has a zippered pocket with a mesh top. Unzip, sand falls out, everything else stays in. Store your sandy flip-flops or swim suit in this spot, too. Genius! You can also purchase these through Amazon.

My mom used to pack our beach gear in brown paper bags. I felt silly hauling those things from the car to the sand. I swore I would never use grocery bags, although I have used the re-usable canvas bags on occasion.

Because of that childhood memory, I consider myself the Queen of Tote Bags. I have a few.

Guys, if you are reading this, a backpack will work for you. Dakine-Wet-Dry-PackDakine (shown here) makes the perfect sturdy backpack with lots of pockets. A large back pocket can even hold your wet clothes or even an entire wet suit! I have used this, too.

Now that we have the tote, what goes in it?

If it is just you heading to the beach, (boy, are you lucky); here are my recommendations for a wonderful, leisurely day at the beach. For easy access, place the following items in a small pouch:

  • Car keys
  • Cash and/or debit card
  • Driver’s License or picture ID
  • Sunglasses
  • Reading glasses
  • Writing implement
  • Phone
  • Lip Balm with 15-30 SPF
  • Optional–Cosmetics, moist towelettes

Add:

  • Towel
  • Change of clothes
  • Swim suit
  • Hat
  • Sunscreen
  • Water
  • Book, magazine (or E-reader).
  • Notebook/Journal
  • Camera
  • Music with earbuds
  • Snack and/or Sandwich
  • Beach chair and/or blanket (may not fit into tote)

Optional:
Ice Chest
Wet suit
Snorkeling gear
Umbrella
Rentals—at many beaches, you can rent equipment like life jackets, boards, chairs, umbrellas, etc.

Beach Umbrella

These same tips can be applied if you have your partner with you. In my case, I add an ice chest with water, beer, snacks, and a bottle opener for hubby. He really needs that ice-cold beer after a session of windsurfing. Most public beaches do not allow alcohol or beverages in glass containers, so check the beach rules before you go.

If you are a parent taking kids to the beach, pack the following:
Include all of the above AND:

  • Extra tote bag
  • Life jackets
  • Beach toys, ball, Frisbee
  • Sunscreen for children (sensitive skin)
  • Sun shelter
  • Patience

Safety warning! If you drive and intend to leave valuables in your vehicle, try to store them in the trunk or out of sight BEFORE you park in the lot or on the street. Do not put your purse or valuables in the trunk while parked. Thieves wait for these opportunities to break into cars once they watch someone doing this!

This post was inspired by a couple of blogs I have read lately. One by Debbie In shape, titled, “What’s In my Gym Bag.” Another, “What’s in My Blog Bag” was posted by another blogger.

What is in YOUR Beach tote?

15 Summer Cycling Safety Tips

Summer-Cycling-Safety

Summer-Cycling-Safety

Summer is upon us and outdoor leisure activities abound! What is better than a bike ride on a beautiful summer day?

Despite the heat and humidity, we still want to ride for fitness and leisure. Don’t let this stop you, but take some time to read through these summer cycling safety tips that will take you through the hot summer months.

General Advice:
Plan ahead and check for weather advisories. Don’t overdo if it will be extremely hot and/or humid, or if the air quality is projected to be poor.

Use protection! Be sure to wear your helmet.Yes, it can be hot, but bike helmets are cool, light, and necessary! Wear appropriate clothing with SPF and wicking material to keep cool and dry. Wear sunscreen on exposed skin.

Stay hydrated. Bring extra water for a longer ride. If you have a hydration pack, this is a good time to use it.

Observe the rules of the road for extra safety. There will be a variety of levels of riders on the roads, including children, and many beginning riders do not always understand how to ride correctly on streets and bike trails.

Give your bicycle a good once-over, especially if you haven’t ridden your bike in a while. Check the frame, lights, reflectors, tires, seat and repair anything before you venture out.

Keep your mobile phone and flat repair kit handy.

Join riding groups if you do not want to ride alone. Look for groups through Facebook, Meet-ups, and through local leisure organizations. Bicycle shops and retailers often have bulletin boards with groups looking to add new riders.

While Riding On the Streets:

Be seen. Wear bright colors. If you are riding on the streets, the bright sun and glare from car windows can make cyclists difficult to see.

To beat the heat, many cyclists ride in the early morning hours or later in the evening. Riding during these times may expose you to more street traffic. These times of day, when the sun is lower in the sky, you are harder to see, so take extra precautions when riding on streets.

Use designated bike lanes when possible but remain aware of traffic.

On Urban Bike Trails:

There are more commuters. Depending on time of day, there may be more riders on the trails, as the good weather makes it desirable to ride to work.

Watch for our wild, four-legged and feathered friends. Deer, squirrels and water fowl may have young that can dart out suddenly onto the trail. If you are riding in the early mornings and evenings, you are more likely to see animals near the trails.

More people are using the trails for jogging, walking, hiking and walking dogs. Trail-ExerciseMore strollers are out, too, and these can take up space in bike lanes. Proceed with extra caution around pedestrians in these circumstances, and keep your speeds low.

Keep a close eye on loiterers. If someone looks suspicious, ride quickly past them. Sadly, assaults on urban bike trails are more common that one would think. Avoid stopping in remote areas along the trails unless there is an emergency. Even men can be victims of assault.

Bicycling is a wonderful activity, whether riding for leisure, to work, or for fitness. Play is safe and keep on riding! For more information on cycling, here are some general tips you may find helpful.


I am linking this post to Debbie In Shape and Midlife Luv midlifeluvbadgeTip-Tuesday-Link-Party-Debbie-in-Shape-weekly-light-small

A Day in the Life of a Delta Windsurfer

Today is Leisurely Thursday and my feature shares thoughts about sports and ageing as well as highlights a day in the life of a Sacramento delta windsurfer.

Windsurfing at Sherman Island

If you follow my blog, you know that I windsurf. So? you may ask? A lot of people do fun leisure activities. I basically started windsurfing to impress my boyfriend six years ago. I always loved the water and had some board experience, so it wasn’t a huge deal to learn a new sport. It must have worked, because we got married two years ago.

Now in my mid-fifties, I started this sport at age 49. Most of the women windsurfers I know learned in their twenties, when they, and the sport, were young. If you are over the age of 50, you probably understand how age affects how we choose our leisure activities.

Here is where I want to say, “Do not let ageing deter you from trying a new leisure activity!” The joys of accomplishing difficult skills along with meeting new people and making new friends as an older adult are irreplaceable!

windsurf

A little bit about the Sacramento Delta. In the Sacramento Valley area of Northern California, as the temperature in the valley increases, a climactic condition is created where the heat draws in the colder, marine air from San Francisco Bay, creating the infamous “delta breeze.” This delta breeze can often be measured at over 30 knots on the confluence of the two rivers, therefore fueling the imaginations of windsurfers and kite boarders alike!

The Rio Vista Windsurf Association is a club for windsurfers and kite boarders. From mid-April through early September, when the wind typically blows in the delta, thus cooling down hot Sacramento, windsurfers come out in droves.

Their sheer dedication is evident by people driving 100s of miles for a weekend of sailing. They come from all over Northern California, LA and San Diego. There is weekend camping available and the personal social networking is top-notch!

Here are some photos of a Day In the Life of a Sacramento Delta Windsurfer

At the beginning of the season, we start getting our campsites ready. Our windsurf area on Sherman Island is only 65 miles southwest of Sacramento. Two rivers, the Sacramento and the San Joaquin, join to create a huge expanse of water on which to recreate.

Trailers
Thar be pirates here!

The Sacramento Valley is flat and we lease private land near pastures that are right next to the levee.

The beach is perfect for family picnics and beginner windsurfers.

Three new windsurfers enjoying a light-wind day
Three new windsurfers enjoying a light-wind day

On a light-wind day, three women connect in leisure as they learn to windsurf.

windsurfers
Windy Labor Day sailing!

These are the moments everyone lives for–wind!!

ship
Why is there a ship?

Every once in a while, ships will head out to sea through the delta’s deep water channel.

Stand-up Paddle
Morning SUP session while waiting for the wind.

Sometimes you have to stand-up paddle when there is no wind and enjoy the day!

Sherman Island
Sunset on Sherman Island Marina

We let boaters have some space in the river on the Sherman Island Marina. They’re already tucked in for the night.

delta sunset
Mid-August cloud fest

This delta sunset is our reward for our hard day of windsurfing! Many folks grab their adult beverages and congregate on top of the levee to unwind and bask in the glow!

Dancin'

And then some of us can’t stop having fun well into the night!

I hope you enjoyed a peek into my world every weekend during the spring and summer. I am still in awe of how so many windsurfers can live their lifestyles around this sport.

A good percentage of these sailors are Baby Boomers in their fifties and older and ageing in this sport has only made them refined and resilient as people who enjoy their leisure and are passionate about it!

Many thanks to Jason at HarsH ReaLitY for the opportunity to share our posts on his blog!