Is Work the Missing Ingredient in Your Retirement Happiness Plan? By Robin Trimingham

If you are at the stage of your life where you are planning your retirement, take a look at this article. Not only do we have to decide if our finances are ready, but we have to determine if we are ready for all the leisure time we will have. Many folks who retire from their “day” jobs, choose to find part-time meaningful work as their second-act!

For more information on retirement, please visit my post Three Ways I Right-Sized in Retirement.

What is your second act going to be? Please share in the comments!

Olderhood.com

Is Work the Missing Ingredient in Your Retirement Happiness Plan? By Robin Trimingham

There has been a lot of talk lately regarding whether Baby Boomers actually plan to stop working when they retire from their current source of employment.

According to a report published by the Transamerica Center for Retirement Studies, only 25% of all American workers intend to cease working immediately when the “reach a certain age or savings goal”, and approximately half intend to keep working for reasons of income and “health benefits”.

A recent Gallup poll concluded that the number of people who intend to work part-time beyond the normal retirement age is even higher, with nearly 75% of the people they surveyed indicating that they will keep working beyond the age of sixty-five.

For many the reason to keep working is not merely financial. The five key benefits of work for older people cited by Dr…

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14 thoughts on “Is Work the Missing Ingredient in Your Retirement Happiness Plan? By Robin Trimingham

  1. It is an interesting process to let go of work entirely and find your own rhythms, purpose, and passions after a lifetime of work. For me this is retirement’s most precious gift. To each her own!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Thanks for sharing this provocative post, Terri. I agree that “to work or not to work” is an important question for today’s retirees. For my husband, work was the missing ingredient in his retirement plan. He is now doing part-time consulting and loving it. For me, I have no current plans to take on any regular form of “work”….I’m simply too busy!

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Although I’ll never say “never,” the thought of working in retirement isn’t something I want to do. I imagine I’ll eventually do more volunteering, but I don’t want to be subject to someone else’s schedule. I don’t think – after almost three years being retired – I’ve ever been bored… that’s not to say that all my hours have been what most people would call “productive” 🙂

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  4. I think complete retirement – one day you’re working full bore and the next day you’re at home forever – can be dangerous on so many levels. Working part time, consulting, transferring to working at home, trying out a new field, or volunteering to a worthy cause on a regular basis will keep you emotionally and physically healthy and looking forward to your life. And it brings in a bit of money usually, always helpful.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. I’m getting closer to retirement and am very excited about being able to pursue activities I love, like writing more, getting back into a choral group, taking senior college courses, spending quality time with family. I can hardly wait! As for a part time job, I’m not against it but not gung ho about it either. I’ll keep you posted!

    Liked by 1 person

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